Photographer's Note

Norway used to be Swedish administered and a lot of old Norwegian architecture was sent to Skansen as representative of Scandinavian architecture in general, from days gone by. A short history explaining the connections with Sweden from Wikipedia:

"Norway entered the Kalmar Union with Denmark and Sweden in 1397. After Sweden left the union in 1523, Norway became the junior partner in DenmarkNorway. The Reformation was introduced in 1537 and absolute monarchy imposed in 1661. In 1814, Norway was ceded to the king of Sweden by the Treaty of Kiel. Norway declared its independence and adopted a constitution. However, no foreign powers recognized the Norwegian independence but supported the Swedish demand for Norway to comply with the treaty of Kiel. After a short war with Sweden, the countries concluded the Convention of Moss, in which Norway accepted a personal union with Sweden, keeping its Constitution, Storting and separate institutions, except for the foreign service. The union was formally established after the extraordinary Storting adopted the necessary amendments to the Constitution and elected Charles XIII of Sweden as king of Norway on 4 November 1814. Industrialization started in the 1840s and from the 1860s large-scale emigration to North America took place. In 1884 the king appointed Johan Sverdrup as prime minister, thus establishing parliamentarism. The union with Sweden was dissolved in 1905."

Taken at the Skansen Open Air Museum which opened in 1897. The small windows were to conserve heat in the harsh winters and the grass roofs act as an insulator.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skansen

I've added a door detail as a workshop.

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Additional Photos by Chris Jules (ChrisJ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 14144 W: 1033 N: 28216] (134564)
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